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Maya Koronyo, PhD

Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Sciences

Research Scientist, Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute

Maya Koronyo, PhD

Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Sciences

Research Scientist, Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute

The lack of effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has necessitated more accurate and earlier diagnostic tools as well as disease-modifying therapies. A major focus of the Koronyo-Hamaoui Lab is development of immune-modulation treatment approaches and the investigation of the role that innate immune cells, especially peripheral monocytes and macrophages, may play in CNS repair and regeneration. The team recently discovered that adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived monocytes to the peripheral blood of symptomatic transgenic AD mice, or immunization with altered myelin-derived antigens, led to marked attenuation of disease progression. This multifaceted immune modulation intervention was found to substantially regulate neuroinflammation, diminish various neuropathologies, and remarkably preserve synapses as well as cognitive function. To enhance capacity of innate immune cells to resist AD pathology, the lab has targeted over-expression of an Aβ degrading enzyme, ACE, to myelomonocytes in murine models of AD. This resulted in substantial prevention of cognitive decline and attenuation of associated pathology. Continued efforts concentrate on identification of novel therapeutic approaches through better understanding of immune mechanisms involved in regulation of detrimental inflammation, clearance of toxic Aβ assemblies, and preservation of synapses by monocytes and macrophages. Another major focus of the Koronyo-Hamaoui Lab has been the pathological change occurring in the retina during AD development as compared to brain pathology. The team has pioneered the identification and characterization of the hallmark pathology of AD, Aβ deposits, in retinas of human patients. These findings have allowed for the development of an innovative method of detecting in vivo retinal amyloid deposits by utilizing curcumin labeling. This noninvasive retinal Aβ plaque imaging has potential applications for earlier AD diagnosis and follow-up response to AD therapies.

View NIH Biographical Sketch as a PDF

  • Undergraduate: Tel-Aviv University, 1995
  • Master's: Tel-Aviv University, 1998
  • Doctorate: Tel-Aviv University, 2005
  • Post Doctorate: Weizmann Institute of Science, 2006
  • Scientific Committee, 12th World Congress of The Society for Brain Mapping & Therapeutics, 2015-current
  • Recipient of Alzheimer’s Disease Research Award, The BrightFocus Foundation, 2013-current
  • Academic Editor: Public Library of Science (PLoS and PLoSONE), 2011-current
  • Academic Editor: Brain, Behavior and Immunity, 2011-current
  • Grant Reviewer: Medical Research Council, 2011-current
  • Grant Reviewer: The Alzheimer’s Association Foundation, 2011-current
  • Grant Reviewer: Israel Science Foundation, 2011-current
  • Grant Reviewer: The Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, 2011-current
  • Recipient of Primary Research Award, Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust Fund, 2012-15
  • Recipient of Collaborative Research Award, DNRCA-CSMC Department of Neurosurgery, 2013-14
  • Recipient of Pioneer in Medicine Award, The Brain Mapping Foundation for Retinal Imaging in Alzheimer’s Disease, 2013
  • Expert Panel Speaker, The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Conference in the Special Interest Group 'Ocular Biomarkers for Early Detection of AD', 2012
  • Summa Cum Laude Master’s Degree, Human Molecular Genetics, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel, 1998
  • Cum Laude Bachelor's Degree, Sackler School of Medicine Faculty Dean, Tel-Aviv University, Israel, 1992-96
  • Wolf Fund Excellence Award & Prize, Sackler School of Medicine Faculty Dean, Tel-Aviv University, Israel, 1992-96
  • Dean's List, Sackler School of Medicine Faculty Dean, Tel-Aviv University, Israel, 1992-96

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Click here for a list of peer-reviewed publications.

  • Koronyo Y, Salumbides BC, Sheyn J, Pelissier L, Li S, Ljubimov V, Moyseyev M, Daley D, Fuchs DT, Pham M, Black KL, Rentsendorj A, Koronyo-Hamaoui M (corresponding author). Therapeutic effects of glatiramer acetate and grafted CD115+ monocytes in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Brain. 2015;138(8):2399-2422.
  • Bernstein KE, Koronyo Y, Salumbides BC, Sheyn J, Pelissier L, Lopes DH, Shah KH, Bernstein EA, Fuchs DT, Yu JJ, Pham M, Black KL, Shen XZ, Fuchs S, Koronyo-Hamaoui M. Angiotensin-converting enzyme overexpression in myelomonocytes prevents Alzheimer's-like cognitive decline. J Clin Invest. 2014;124(3):1000-1012.
  • Koronyo Y, Salumbides BC, Black KL, Koronyo-Hamaoui M. Alzheimer's disease in the retina: imaging retinal Aβ plaques for early diagnosis and therapy assessment. Neurodegener Dis. 2012;10(1-4):285-293.
  • Koronyo-Hamaoui M, Koronyo Y, Ljubimov AV, Miller CA, Ko MK, Black KL, Schwartz M, Farkas DL. Identification of amyloid plaques in retinas from Alzheimer's patients and noninvasive in vivo optical imaging of retinal plaques in a mouse model. Neuroimage. 2011;54 Suppl 1:S204-217.
  • Bakalash S, Pham M, Koronyo Y, Salumbides B, Kramerov A, Seidenberg H, Berel D, Black KL and Koronyo-Hamaoui M (corresponding author). Egr1 expression is induced following glatiramer acetate immunotherapy in rodent models of glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011;52(12):9033-9046.
  • Koronyo-Hamaoui M, Ko MK, Koronyo Y, Azoulay D, Seksenyan A, Kunis G, Pham M, Bakhsheshian J, Rogeri P, Black KL, et al. Attenuation of AD-like neuropathology by harnessing peripheral immune cells: local elevation of IL-10 and MMP-9. J Neurochem. 2009;111(6):1409-1424.
  • Butovsky O, Koronyo-Hamaoui M, Kunis G, Ophir E, Landa G, Cohen H, Schwartz M. Glatiramer acetate fights against Alzheimer's disease by inducing dendritic-like microglia expressing insulin-like growth factor 1. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 2006;103(31):11784-11789.
  • Koronyo-Hamaoui M, Danziger Y, Frisch A, Stein D, Leor S, Laufer N, Carel C, Fennig S, Minoumi M, Apter A, et al. Association between anorexia nervosa and the hsKCa3 gene: a family-based and case control study. Mol Psychiatry. 2002;7(1):82-85.

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